WEEK
DATES
COURSE WORK
COMMON CORE STANDARDS
Vocab
HOMEWORK
1

Basic Skills and
Narrative Writing
JANUARY 22-25
Exploring the Human Experience- Overarching Theme for English I

Dialectical Journals Explained and Practiced
Look Fors for Analyzing a Text

Literary Terminology- Review from previous years

"I AM" Poem Activities

Blogging

Free-writing Activity

CDT (Classroom Diagnostic Tool)
CYCCLA.1.4.9.B Write with a sharp distinct focus identifying topic, task, and audience.

CYCCLA.1.5.9.A Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions on grades level topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
Journaling
Dialectical
Rhetoric


Literary Terms:
plot
setting
mood
conflict
theme
tone
characters
theme
irony
foreshadow
"I AM" Poem

Bring in a photo of yourself or email me a wallet sized photo of yourself

Ask your parents/guardians why they named you what they named you. Find out any family history, meanings, etc... behind your first, middle, last name.
2

Basic Skills and
Narrative Writing
JANUARY
28-FEBRUARY 1
Overview of John Collins Writing

Power of Literature Discussion

"The Story of an Hour" Kate Chopin

Mrs. Anderson's Annotated Version:


"Jabberwocky" Lewis Carroll

Figurative Language- imagery, simile, metaphor, personification

Introduction to John Collins Type Two:
Today's Jabberwocky- Write your own using slang and terms only today's teens would know and understand (similar to the child in Jabberwocky). Identify an adolescent fear today within your poem or story.

House on Mango Street "My Name" excerpt Sandra Cisneros

"My Name is Esperanza" Poem

Narrative Writing- "What's in a Name?"- brainstorm activity

Goal Setting

Mini-Lesson- reading for meaning and reading with meaning- "acting out" appropriately

A Raisin in the Sun excerpt Lorraine Hansburry
Mr. Lindner vs. Walter Lee- Social Experience
Beneatha- Cultural Experience
CYCCLA.1.2.9.A Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

CYCCLA.1.2.9.D Determine an author's particular point of view and analyze how rhetoric advances the point of view.

CYCCLA.1.2.9.J Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.B Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences and conclusions based on an author's explicit assumptions and beliefs about a subject.

CYCCLA 1.3.9.D Determine an author's particular point of view and analyze how rhetoric advances the point of view.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.E Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it and manipulate time create an effect.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.G Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.J Demonstrate understanding across content areas within grade appropriate level texts of figurative language, word relationships, and the shades of meaning among related words.

CYCCLA.1.4.9.B Write with a sharp distinct focus identifying topic, task, and audience.

CYCCLA.1.5.9.A Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions on grades level topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
Course Terminology-
Revenge
Regret
Passion
Perception
Honor
Journey
Hero
Reflection


Figurative Language- imagery, simile, metaphor, personification, allusion
"What's in a Name?"- brainstorm and family research on first, middle, last name

Ask your family why you were named what you were named? What is the story behind your name? What is the meaning behind your last name? Heritage? You may always do a Google Search to determine the meaning behind your first, middle, last name. You should also use your resources of family folklore and/or ancestry.com

Write your own "Jabberwocky" poem using "teen speak"- whatever your version may be. Your "teen speak" may be today's slang, a particular subject of interest (band "talk," science "talk," etc...)
assigned: 8/30
due 8/31
3

Revenge
and
Regret
FEBRUARY
4-8
Political Moments reflected in Literature:
"The Story of an Hour"
"A Raisin in the Sun"
"We Didn't Start the Fire"- allusion study
"Imagine"

Introduction to John Collins Type Three:
Name Narrative

WRITING PROMPT: Writers often highlight the values of a culture or a society by using characters who are alienated from that culture or society because of gender, race, class, or creed. Choose a novel or a play in which such a character plays a significant role and show how that character's alienation reveals the surrounding society's assumptions or moral values. Stories read in class may be used.

Introduction of Unit Essential Questions:

1. What is the relationship between decisions and consequences?

2. How do we know how to make good decisions?

3. How can a person's decisions and actions change his/her life? 4. How do the decisions and actions of characters reveal their personalities?

5. How do decisions, actions, and consequences vary depending on the different perspectives of the people involved


Read "The Most Dangerous Game" Richard Connell
Read Aloud:
Part One
Part Two
Part Three


"The Most Dangerous Game" text

Companion Text Handouts:

Expectations for effective group work/whole class work

Note-taking Strategies Modeled and Practiced

Dialectical Journal Entry

Literature Circle Introductions and Selections- Round One

Introduction to John Collins Type Four:
FCAs- all names included, figurative language within each paragraph (3-5 examples at least), modeled off in-class exemplars
Narrative Writing- What's in a Name?- Writing with Figurative Language

Review of "What's in a Name?" exemplars

Literature Circle Meeting #1- focus on- exposition, protagonist, character analysis: round, flat, static, dynamic; Text "look fors"
CYCCLA.1.3.9 Students read and respond to works of literature - with emphasis on comprehension, making connections among ideas and between texts with focus on textual evidence.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.B Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences and conclusions based on an author's explicit assumptions and beliefs about a subject.

CYCCLA 1.3.9.D Determine an author's particular point of view and analyze how rhetoric advances the point of view.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.E Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it and manipulate time create an effect.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.G Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.J Demonstrate understanding across content areas within grade appropriate level texts of figurative language, word relationships, and the shades of meaning among related words.

CYCCLA.1.4.9 Students write for different purposes and audiences. Students write clear and focused text to convey a well-defined perspective and appropriate content.

CYCCLA.1.4.9.A Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately.

CYCCLA.1.5.9 Students present appropriately in formal speaking situations, listen critically, and respond intelligently as individuals or in group discussions.

CYCCLA.1.5.9.A Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions on grades level topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
Plot-

Exposition: setting (time, place, social context),characters, mood, tone, theme, point of view

Conflict
Rising Action
Climax
Falling Action Resolution

Figurative Language-

Metaphor
Simile
Imagery
Flashback
Foreshadow
Personification

Connotation
Point of View

Grammar:

Pronoun
Antecedent
Fragment
Complete Sentences
What's in a Name Narrative- Create an example of simile, metaphor, and personification for each of your names

What's in a Name Narrative-Model your rough draft after exemplars shared in class today


"What's in a Name?" Narrative Due- Friday
4

Revenge
and
Regret
FEBRUARY
19-22
Read "The Cask of Amontillado" Edgar Allan Poe


Search and Find Activity: which words/phrases from the text build the mood? (dialectical journal)

How to annotate poetry: SOAPSTone, marking a text, connections, questions, connotation; "Sweet Revenge" Matt Pyke- connections to "Cask of Amontillado"- similarities, differences, author's purpose: http://www.poems-and-quotes.com/dark/poems.php?id=264118

Read "The Sniper" Liam O'Flarhetry
Companion Texts and Review SOAPSTone
"The Man He Killed" Thomas Hardy
All is Quiet on the Western Front excerpt Erich Maria Remarque
"In Binh (Peace) Province" Denise Levertov
Identifying a thesis for writing activity
Companion Text Handouts:

Types of Plot- happily ever after, unhappy, fork in the road, quest, rescue, pursuit, revenge, maturation, sacrifice, transformation

John Collins Type Three:
FCAs- characterization, plot, figurative language (3 examples)
Writing a Short Story- brainstorm a plot for a short story 1-2 pages typed


*If time allows, read "The Bet" Anton Chekhov and analyze for direct/indirect characterization
CYCCLA.1.3.9 Students read and respond to works of literature - with emphasis on comprehension, making connections among ideas and between texts with focus on textual evidence.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.B Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences and conclusions based on an author's explicit assumptions and beliefs about a subject.

CYCCLA 1.3.9.D Determine an author's particular point of view and analyze how rhetoric advances the point of view.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.E Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it and manipulate time create an effect.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.G Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.J Demonstrate understanding across content areas within grade appropriate level texts of figurative language, word relationships, and the shades of meaning among related words.

CYCCLA.1.4.9 Students write for different purposes and audiences. Students write clear and focused text to convey a well-defined perspective and appropriate content.

CYCCLA.1.4.9.A Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately.

CYCCLA.1.5.9 Students present appropriately in formal speaking situations, listen critically, and respond intelligently as individuals or in group discussions.

CYCCLA.1.5.9.A Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions on grades level topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
Cask
Amontillado
Fortunado (fortune)
irony
mood
tone
setting
direct characterization

inference
conflict
antagonist protagonist
point of view
irony- situational dramatic, verbal

SOAPSTone- speaker, occasion, audience, purpose, subject, tone

thesis
theme
companion text
FORMATTING MLA PAPERS:
Video Tour
Google

MS Word

http://www.screenr.com/gUQ8



Short Story- Type 3- To be written on days you do not attend the Get Real program
5
Perception
FEBRUARY
25-March 1
Personal Lens Activity

Library Visit- Resources, Materials, and Research

Introduction of Unit Essential Questions:

1. Why is it important for people and cultures to construct narratives for their cultures?

2. How can you use language to empower yourself?

3. Is it possible to have culture without language?

4. How can one utilize life experiences as a foundation for creative and expressive thinking?

Introduce Research Project
John Collins Type Five
Inquiry-Based Learning-
What does the text tell us about science (complexity of humans), social studies (culture & society), and math (economy & social status)? What does this text have in common with other literature?

Read and Annotate "My Papa's Waltz" Theodore Roethke- imagery and connotation

Viewing from different lenses
Re-read and analyze for other poetry terminology that can be identified within the text

Companion Texts:
"Those Winter Sundays" Robert Hayden
"Dance with My Father" Luther Vandross- video
annotate for structure/diction, style, free verse

Li-Young Lee. "The Gift."
http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/171752

Giovanni, Nikki. "Love Is."
http://www.afropoets.net/nikkigiovanni6.html

SOAPSTone for all texts read this week

Blogging

Read Around of various poetry to identify types and rules

Complete any outstanding work from other previous units
CYCCLA.1.2.9.A Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
CYCCLA.1.2.9.F Analyze how words and phrases shape meaning and tone in texts.

CYCCLA 1.3.9.D Determine an author's particular point of view and analyze how rhetoric advances the point of view.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.F Analyze how words and phrases shape meaning and tone in texts.

CYCCLA.1.4.9.W Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.

CYCCLA.1.5.9.E Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks.

CYCCLA.1.5.9.F Make strategic use of digital media in presentations to add interest and enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence.
Elements of Poetry:
mood
tone
connotation
point of view
lyrical poetry
hiaku
assonance
consonance
dramatic poetry
enjambment
alliteration
analogy
assonance
ballad
blank verse consonance
diction
free verse
heroic couplet imagery
meter
narrative poetry octet
ode
rhyme
rhyme scheme rhythm
sestet
sonnet (Petrarchan, Shakespearean)
Short Story- To be written on the days you do not attend the Get Real program Due next Friday


Research Paper- Research one poet. Identify how that poet and his/her background influences the poetry written. Must analyze 3 or more poems. Incorporate all your ideas and use the terminology studied in class for your research analysis.


Read several (3 or more) poems on the website- Poetry Out Loud. Then, in that same way, write your own poem (10-20 lines in length) to present to the class. This counts as your first Listening and Speaking benchmark grade.
6
Perception
March
4-8
Writing an introduction to a paper. Strategies and format- Hook/Attention Grabber, Broad Statement, Narrow Statement, and Thesis.-

Letter Writing Format

Introduction to Shakespeare

Shakespearean Sonnets

Introduction to "Romeo and Juliet"
CYCCLA.1.2.9.A Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
CYCCLA.1.2.9.F Analyze how words and phrases shape meaning and tone in texts.

CYCCLA 1.3.9.D Determine an author's particular point of view and analyze how rhetoric advances the point of view.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.F Analyze how words and phrases shape meaning and tone in texts.

CYCCLA.1.4.9.W Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.

CYCCLA.1.5.9.E Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks.

CYCCLA.1.5.9.F Make strategic use of digital media in presentations to add interest and enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence.
Elements of Poetry:
mood
tone
connotation
point of view
lyrical poetry
hiaku
assonance
consonance
dramatic poetry
enjambment
alliteration
analogy
assonance
ballad
blank verse consonance
diction
free verse
heroic couplet imagery
meter
narrative poetry octet
ode
rhyme
rhyme scheme rhythm
sestet
sonnet (Petrarchan, Shakespearean)
Persuasive Letter Writing Project- what you perceive to be an issue within the school/district
7

Passion
MARCH
11-15
Unit Vocabulary:


"Romeo and Juliet" by William Shakespeare

Need Extra Help? Go Here: No Fear Shakespeare

Introduction of Essential Questions:


1. When does a passion or positive personality trait become a tragic flaw?

2. How do authors use the resources of language to impact an audience?

Literature Circle Meeting Day
CYCCLA.1.2.9 Students read, understand, and respond to informational text with emphasis on comprehension, making connections among ideas and between texts with focus on textual evidence.

CYCCLA.1.2.9.B Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences and conclusions based on an author's explicit assumptions and beliefs about a subject.

CYCCLA.1.2.9.J Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.
CYCCLA.1.3.9 Students read and respond to works of literature - with emphasis on comprehension, making connections among ideas and between texts with focus on textual evidence.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.C Analyze how complex characters develoo over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.E Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it and manipulate time create an effect.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.H Analyze how an author draws on and transforms themes, topics, character types, and/or other text elements from source material in a specific work.
CYCCLA.1.4.9 Students write for different purposes and audiences. Students write clear and focused text to convey a well-defined perspective and appropriate content.

CYCCLA.1.4.9.G Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics.

CYCCLA.1.5.9 Students present appropriately in formal speaking situations, listen critically, and respond intelligently as individuals or in group discussions.

CYCCLA.1.5.9.A Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions on grades level topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

CYCCLA.1.5.9.D Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning; ensure that the presentation is appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
aside
blank verse
classical allusions
comedy
dialogue
dramatic irony
foil
Greek chorus
heroic couplet
iambic pentameter
monologue
protagonist
soliloquy
sonnet (Petrarchan, Shakespearean)
tragedy
tragic hero
tragic flaw
tragic illumination

8
Passion
MARCH
18-22
"Romeo and Juliet" Act One and Act Two

Weekly Project: Task One

Audio of Text

Nonfiction Connection- from Black Boy Richard Wright pg. 654- autobiography

Literary Elements common to fiction and nonfiction- inference, figurative language, characterization
CYCCLA.1.2.9 Students read, understand, and respond to informational text with emphasis on comprehension, making connections among ideas and between texts with focus on textual evidence.

CYCCLA.1.2.9.B Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences and conclusions based on an author's explicit assumptions and beliefs about a subject.

CYCCLA.1.2.9.J Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.
CYCCLA.1.3.9 Students read and respond to works of literature - with emphasis on comprehension, making connections among ideas and between texts with focus on textual evidence.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.C Analyze how complex characters develoo over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.E Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it and manipulate time create an effect.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.H Analyze how an author draws on and transforms themes, topics, character types, and/or other text elements from source material in a specific work.
CYCCLA.1.4.9 Students write for different purposes and audiences. Students write clear and focused text to convey a well-defined perspective and appropriate content.

CYCCLA.1.4.9.G Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics.

CYCCLA.1.5.9 Students present appropriately in formal speaking situations, listen critically, and respond intelligently as individuals or in group discussions.

CYCCLA.1.5.9.A Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions on grades level topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

CYCCLA.1.5.9.D Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning; ensure that the presentation is appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
aside
blank verse
classical allusions
comedy
dialogue
dramatic irony
foil
Greek chorus
heroic couplet
iambic pentameter
monologue
protagonist
soliloquy
sonnet (Petrarchan, Shakespearean)
tragedy
tragic hero
tragic flaw
tragic illumination

9
Passion
MARCH
25-29
"Romeo and Juliet" Acts Two and Three

Weekly Project: Task Two


Audio of Text

Writing Prompt:
A recurring theme in literature is the classic war between a passion and responsibility. For instance, a personal cause, a love, a desire for revenge, a determination to redress a wrong, or some other emotion or drive may conflict with moral duty. Explain how Shakespeare does this in "Romeo and Juliet" in which a character confronts the demands of a private passion that conflicts with his or her responsibilities. In a well-written essay show clearly the nature of the conflict, its effects upon the character, and its significance to the work.
CYCCLA.1.2.9 Students read, understand, and respond to informational text with emphasis on comprehension, making connections among ideas and between texts with focus on textual evidence.

CYCCLA.1.2.9.B Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences and conclusions based on an author's explicit assumptions and beliefs about a subject.

CYCCLA.1.2.9.J Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.
CYCCLA.1.3.9 Students read and respond to works of literature - with emphasis on comprehension, making connections among ideas and between texts with focus on textual evidence.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.C Analyze how complex characters develoo over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.E Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it and manipulate time create an effect.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.H Analyze how an author draws on and transforms themes, topics, character types, and/or other text elements from source material in a specific work.
CYCCLA.1.4.9 Students write for different purposes and audiences. Students write clear and focused text to convey a well-defined perspective and appropriate content.

CYCCLA.1.4.9.G Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics.

CYCCLA.1.5.9 Students present appropriately in formal speaking situations, listen critically, and respond intelligently as individuals or in group discussions.

CYCCLA.1.5.9.A Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions on grades level topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

CYCCLA.1.5.9.D Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning; ensure that the presentation is appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
aside
blank verse
classical allusions
comedy
dialogue
dramatic irony
foil
Greek chorus
heroic couplet
iambic pentameter
monologue
protagonist
soliloquy
sonnet (Petrarchan, Shakespearean)
tragedy
tragic hero
tragic flaw
tragic illumination

10
Passion
APRIL
1-5
"Romeo and Juliet" Acts Three and Four

Weekly Project: Task Three

Audio of Text

Critical Lens Prompt:

"One meets his destiny often in the road he takes to avoid it." -French Proverb


CYCCLA.1.2.9 Students read, understand, and respond to informational text with emphasis on comprehension, making connections among ideas and between texts with focus on textual evidence.

CYCCLA.1.2.9.B Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences and conclusions based on an author's explicit assumptions and beliefs about a subject.

CYCCLA.1.2.9.J Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.
CYCCLA.1.3.9 Students read and respond to works of literature - with emphasis on comprehension, making connections among ideas and between texts with focus on textual evidence.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.C Analyze how complex characters develoo over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.E Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it and manipulate time create an effect.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.H Analyze how an author draws on and transforms themes, topics, character types, and/or other text elements from source material in a specific work.
CYCCLA.1.4.9 Students write for different purposes and audiences. Students write clear and focused text to convey a well-defined perspective and appropriate content.

CYCCLA.1.4.9.G Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics.

CYCCLA.1.5.9 Students present appropriately in formal speaking situations, listen critically, and respond intelligently as individuals or in group discussions.

CYCCLA.1.5.9.A Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions on grades level topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

CYCCLA.1.5.9.D Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning; ensure that the presentation is appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
aside
blank verse
classical allusions
comedy
dialogue
dramatic irony
foil
Greek chorus
heroic couplet
iambic pentameter
monologue
protagonist
soliloquy
sonnet (Petrarchan, Shakespearean)
tragedy
tragic hero
tragic flaw
tragic illumination

11
Passion
APRIL
8-12
"Romeo and Juliet" Acts Four and Five

Weekly Project: Tasks Four and Five


Audio of Text

Nonfiction Connection- Martin Luther King's Speech "I Have a Dream"- Comparison between MLK and Prince at the end of Act V
CYCCLA.1.2.9 Students read, understand, and respond to informational text with emphasis on comprehension, making connections among ideas and between texts with focus on textual evidence.

CYCCLA.1.2.9.B Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences and conclusions based on an author's explicit assumptions and beliefs about a subject.

CYCCLA.1.2.9.J Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.
CYCCLA.1.3.9 Students read and respond to works of literature - with emphasis on comprehension, making connections among ideas and between texts with focus on textual evidence.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.C Analyze how complex characters develoo over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.E Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it and manipulate time create an effect.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.H Analyze how an author draws on and transforms themes, topics, character types, and/or other text elements from source material in a specific work.
CYCCLA.1.4.9 Students write for different purposes and audiences. Students write clear and focused text to convey a well-defined perspective and appropriate content.

CYCCLA.1.4.9.G Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics.

CYCCLA.1.5.9 Students present appropriately in formal speaking situations, listen critically, and respond intelligently as individuals or in group discussions.

CYCCLA.1.5.9.A Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions on grades level topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

CYCCLA.1.5.9.D Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning; ensure that the presentation is appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
aside
blank verse
classical allusions
comedy
dialogue
dramatic irony
foil
Greek chorus
heroic couplet
iambic pentameter
monologue
protagonist
soliloquy
sonnet (Petrarchan, Shakespearean)
tragedy
tragic hero
tragic flaw
tragic illumination

12
Journey of the Hero
APRIL
15-19
"The Odyssey" by Homer

Pass It On Activity- an exploration of Oral and Literate Tradition- Fairy Tales, Tall Tales, Fables, and Myths

Journey of the Hero

Visual Presentation- Hero's Journey

Introduction of Essential Questions:

1. Are we guided by fate, free will, a greater power, or do we fall somewhere else on the spectrum?

2. How do the attributes of a hero change or remain the same over time?
CYCCLA.1.2.9 Students read, understand, and respond to informational text with emphasis on comprehension, making connections among ideas and between texts with focus on textual evidence.
CYCCLA.1.2.9.G Analyze various accounts of a subject told in different mediums (e.g.a person's life story in both print and multimedia), determining which details are emphasized in each account.
CYCCLA.1.3.9 Students read and respond to works of literature - with emphasis on comprehension, making connections among ideas and between texts with focus on textual evidence.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.A Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.C Analyze how complex characters develoo over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

CYCCLA.1.4.9 Students write for different purposes and audiences. Students write clear and focused text to convey a well-defined perspective and appropriate content.

CYCCLA.1.4.9.B Write with a sharp distinct focus identifying topic, task, and audience.
CYCCLA.1.5.9 Students present appropriately in formal speaking situations, listen critically, and respond intelligently as individuals or in group discussions.

CYCCLA.1.5.9.C Evaluate a speaker's perspective, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence.

CYCCLA.1.5.9.G Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English when speaking based on grade 9 level and content.
the classical epic poem
archetype
arete
epic poetry
epic/Homeric simile
epithet
hero
heroic couplet
iambic pentameter
invocation
oral tradition
chronological order
Begin Reading To Kill a Mockingbird
Chapters 1-5
13
Journey of the Hero
APRIL
22-26
"The Odyssey"

"My Epic Hero" poem

Gallery of Heroes
CYCCLA.1.2.9 Students read, understand, and respond to informational text with emphasis on comprehension, making connections among ideas and between texts with focus on textual evidence.
CYCCLA.1.2.9.G Analyze various accounts of a subject told in different mediums (e.g.a person's life story in both print and multimedia), determining which details are emphasized in each account.
CYCCLA.1.3.9 Students read and respond to works of literature - with emphasis on comprehension, making connections among ideas and between texts with focus on textual evidence.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.A Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.C Analyze how complex characters develoo over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

CYCCLA.1.4.9 Students write for different purposes and audiences. Students write clear and focused text to convey a well-defined perspective and appropriate content.

CYCCLA.1.4.9.B Write with a sharp distinct focus identifying topic, task, and audience.
CYCCLA.1.5.9 Students present appropriately in formal speaking situations, listen critically, and respond intelligently as individuals or in group discussions.

CYCCLA.1.5.9.C Evaluate a speaker's perspective, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence.

CYCCLA.1.5.9.G Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English when speaking based on grade 9 level and content.
the classical epic poem
archetype
arete
epic poetry
epic/Homeric simile
epithet
hero
heroic couplet
iambic pentameter
invocation
oral tradition
chronological order
To Kill a Mockingbird

Chapters 6-10

Research Paper- Poet- growth and influences over the years
14
APRIL
29-MAY 3
"The Odyssey"

Star Wars Connection- Media today

Poetry Connection: "The Road Not Taken" Robert Frost pg. 288
CYCCLA.1.2.9 Students read, understand, and respond to informational text with emphasis on comprehension, making connections among ideas and between texts with focus on textual evidence.
CYCCLA.1.2.9.G Analyze various accounts of a subject told in different mediums (e.g.a person's life story in both print and multimedia), determining which details are emphasized in each account.
CYCCLA.1.3.9 Students read and respond to works of literature - with emphasis on comprehension, making connections among ideas and between texts with focus on textual evidence.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.A Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

CYCCLA.1.3.9.C Analyze how complex characters develoo over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

CYCCLA.1.4.9 Students write for different purposes and audiences. Students write clear and focused text to convey a well-defined perspective and appropriate content.

CYCCLA.1.4.9.B Write with a sharp distinct focus identifying topic, task, and audience.
CYCCLA.1.5.9 Students present appropriately in formal speaking situations, listen critically, and respond intelligently as individuals or in group discussions.

CYCCLA.1.5.9.C Evaluate a speaker's perspective, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence.

CYCCLA.1.5.9.G Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English when speaking based on grade 9 level and content.
the classical epic poem
archetype
arete
epic poetry
epic/Homeric simile
epithet
hero
heroic couplet
iambic pentameter
invocation
oral tradition
chronological order
To Kill a Mockingbird

Chapters 11-15
Honor
15
MAY
6-10
To Kill A Mockingbird Harper Lee


To Kill a Mockingbird

Chapters 16-20
Honor
16
MAY
13-17
To Kill A Mockingbird Harper Lee


To Kill a Mockingbird

Chapters 21-end
Honor
17
MAY
20-24
To Kill A Mockingbird Harper Lee



Honor
18
MAY
27-31
Reflection Unit



Reflection
AND EXAMS
19
JUNE
3-7
Revisit entire semester of the Human Experience